Life In Plastic: TOY REVIEW: Xenomorph (Alien Covenant)

 

And so, right after I say that I can’t find the Covenant Xenomorph, I step into a Toys R Us that’s a little further from my home than the others, and find like ten of them on the pegs. Xenos as far as the eye can see! And so, now we’ve got the last of three Covenant figures: The Xenomorph.

Two “traditional” Xenos showed up at the end of the movie – one that hogged a lot of ad and trialer space, and was fought on the surface of the escape shuttle in a surprisingly tense sequence, and another inside the ship itself for some traditional Alien-hunting and airlock-spacing. The second one’s appearance was a predictable surprise – you knew it was happening, but the reveal was done wlel enough that it wasn’t a problem.

An argument in favor of David making a “different” Xenomorph breed is that it is indeed altered fro the original – more organic, with a thin layer of skin and fewer “biomechanical” details. Pity the script didn’t keep that bit in, but you can still infer it from the movie if you’d like. Anyway, this figure is the fastest-selling of the Covenant crew, since it has the broadest appeal. Let’s take a look!

 

PACKAGING: ****

NECA is slowly but surely moving to window boxes, and this looks classy! its a lot easier to open and reseal than a clamshell, too!

 

SCULPT: ****

As previously said, this isn’t quite he same as the “classic” Xenomorph. It’s slightly more organic design actually resembles the versions seen in Alien 3, Resurrection, ahd the AvP films. In this case, the differences aren’t immediately obvious in the movie, but they are there.

Its dorsal spines are long and thin, slightly different from any other Xenomorph version out there. Again, it looks somewhat bonier, wth the pseudo-mechanical parts of Giger’s design downplayed or undone.

The sculpting on this figure is fantastic. NECA’s Alien work is amazing already, so this is not unexpected. It is worth repeating, though – even people who disliked the movie will probably enjoy this design. And yes, it does have an inner jaw.

 

PAINT: ****

Much like the Xeno from Aliens and the Dog Alien from 3, this one has some faint brown paint – it’s not as yelowish as the one from Aliens, nor as reddish as the Dog Alien, but the brown is there. Xenomorphs are rarley beetle-black, despite how they may seem in movie lighting.

Although the paint seems simple, the application is excellent – the result is something that looks like it can organically exist, which makes the figure seem way better than its price point.

The dome is of course translucent, and the little hints of ridges and a skull face underneath are perfectly done.

 

ARTICULATION: ****

See that pose? You can take that pose. The Xenomorph’s articulation is fantastic, and you can stably put it in pretty much any pose.

Its inner jaw is exceptionally long, and does not feel loose, either.

Essentially, although the figure is meant to be posed on a shelf, kids could easily enjoy messing with the articulation.

 

ACCESSORIES: N/A

Nope. Nothing. It’s a lot taller than the Neomoprh, which might explain that.

 

VALUE: ***1/2

This figure should cost you about $24, which is the standard for NECA. Small as the figure is, it’s got good extras, and great playability.

 

THINGS TO WATCH OUT FOR:

It seems fairly durable.

 

WHERE TO BUY:

Toys R Us is your best bet right now.

 

OVERALL: ****

Feelings about the movie are kind of mixed, but the creature designs are top-notch, regardless. The Xenomorph may be an oldie, but it’s also a goodie, and this design varies it just enough to be unique.

It’s interesting how the dried, stretched skin is something done in other movies, but it does succeed in differentiating David’s breed of Xenomorphs from the ones we have seen in other movies before. And the figure looks great even without the connection, as well, and although it lacks the sheer inventiveness of the NEomorph and Accessory Pack, it’s still a wlecome addition to the line.

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